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Many I talk to confuse the power or weight of the rod blank vs the action of the rod blank.
 

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When you're fishing with artificial lures, you'll want a rod that's on the stiffer side so that you can get a good hook set and have enough power to bring in the fish.
Thats pretty bad advice.
 

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Thats pretty bad advice.
Would be species dependent I guess whether to be true or not. Would hold true on species with tougher mouths but most definitely not true in regards to specks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Power/Action preference for different trout applications

Thats pretty bad advice.
These guys use a lot of weedless swim baits on the grass flats. They feel like they get a better hook-up rate with a medium or medium-heavy power, depending on the rod company. It's just a matter of preference.

I would be very interested in hearing opinions on Power/Action preference for different trout applications, i.e. topwater, hard jerkbaits, soft plastics, live croaker etc.

Thanks in advance!
 

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These guys use a lot of weedless swim baits on the grass flats. They feel like they get a better hook-up rate with a medium or medium-heavy power, depending on the rod company. It's just a matter of preference.

I would be very interested in hearing opinions on Power/Action preference for different trout applications, i.e. topwater, hard jerkbaits, soft plastics, live croaker etc.

Thanks in advance!
For trout I tend to use a Medium-Light power rod with soft plastics and hard baits, except for bigger top waters where you need a heavier rod to handle the lure weight. I also use Extra-Fast action rods so that helps with hook sets, although when trout are hitting aggressively a hook set is hardly necessary. Last winter I did a little more deep water fishing for trout and I found a medium power rod helped with the hook set in that situation.
 

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These guys use a lot of weedless swim baits on the grass flats. They feel like they get a better hook-up rate with a medium or medium-heavy power, depending on the rod company. It's just a matter of preference.

I would be very interested in hearing opinions on Power/Action preference for different trout applications, i.e. topwater, hard jerkbaits, soft plastics, live croaker etc.

Thanks in advance!
I was implying what SJ said, that it depends on technique and target species. If you're throwing a a twitch bait with treble hooks or topwater for trout, youre going to be ripping it through its lips.

Personally, I like medium-light or a medium rod for almost all inshore applications. I rarely ever use live bait, though.

Ill use a medium-heavy if Im throwing a popping cork, but I rarely do that. In the winter, I want a fast tip to feel the fish on the bottom.

I throw a lot of weedless swimbaits and do fine with a 6'6'' medium-light and a 7' medium. I have a hard time staying in contact with the lure and the botttom with a heavier rod and I can work a medium easier, but thats a personal thing.
 

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It all boils down to this. If you like the rod you have and you catch fish with it then that's the right rod for you. I have caught trout on every rod power from ultra-light to heavy, and on fly rods from 3 weights to 12 weights (had a few trout grab tarpon flies). How you prefer to fish matters most.

If your new to fishing a medium powered, fast action rod paired with a size 100 bait casting reel or a 2500-3000 sized spinning reel are like the F-150 or the Chevy 1500 of inshore fishing. They handle most fishing better than good. After you gain some experience you can, if you choose, invest in some other set ups that are more targeted at a certain species or technique.
 

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Ya'll got it wrong, or at least partially when it comes to hook set. IMO of course.

The power of the rod is what lets you fight the fish quickly. And that can also be important for hook setting for say reds or jacks. What is more important for soft mouthed fish like trout is a soft responsive tip. This allows the angler to set hook without ripping the fishes lips off.

Now you can certainly hook trout with a stiff fast action heavy rod. But then its much more about angler ability and technique than the rod.

But at the end of the day Bob's last point is exactly right. If you can catch fish on it then its a good rod for you!!
 

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For trout I use a med-L with a fast tip for jig fishing. I use a lighter weight med-L (all med-L's are not the same) with a fast tip for the smaller/lighter hard plastic jerk baits. I use a med- with an extra fast tip for the bigger/heavier hard plastic jerk baits and top water. When I do use a popping cork I use a 7' med with a med fast tip spinning rod.
 

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Most of what I build for trout are on medium power popping blanks. Mod-fast to fast action with a soft, small diameter tip. Good for shrimp on a popping cork and 1/4oz jigs too. You can cast without jerking the shrimp off and set the hook without ripping their lip. The same blanks have worked well as drop shot rods for bass in med or med-light power. There are a few popping blanks available in a med-hvy (10-20) power that work well for big trout and redfish. Probably a little more versatile for larger jigs and jerkbaits and some bottom fishing. Action is how far from the tip the rod bends when you load it up. Slow action is a noodle that bends all the way to the handle. Not as likely to break when a big shark gets to the boat and decides he doesn't want in. You don't ever want the rod tip bent more than 90 degrees from the butt. The faster the action, the quicker it gets there with less arm or fish movement. Mod or mod-fast is preferred for crankbaits where you want the rod partially loaded on the retrieve but with some extra give farther down, so you can set the hook without breaking the tip. As long as you keep the angle low, you are fighting the fish with the mid/butt section with a little angle using the tip for some cushion and keeping the line tight if he changes direction. Something else about action. If you take kids out for some white trout fishing and they want to use their kiddie rod they may be disappointed. A few years back I did the same and noticed they couldn't get a hookset. The rods were all moderate action. Fine for bream or catfish, and less likely to be broken by a beginner, but it takes a lot of arm movement to load the rod up enough to set the hook, especially with a short arm. I got them using spinning reels and got some cheap med-heavy fast 6' rods, and the results were much better. Some of my opinions and things I've learned. I wish I had more time for field testing. The more rods and blanks I put my hands on and compare, the more I learn.
 
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