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I switched over to lithium batteries in all of my cameras this year. I know they last a lot longer, but all of my cameras show 99% battery life left after 5 months of use. Do yall think that is correct or do the cameras get a false reading with those batteries? The cameras are from 3 different manufacturers and have taken thousands of photos and videos.
 

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I switched over to lithium batteries in all of my cameras this year. I know they last a lot longer, but all of my cameras show 99% battery life left after 5 months of use. Do yall think that is correct or do the cameras get a false reading with those batteries? The cameras are from 3 different manufacturers and have taken thousands of photos and videos.
That's not going to be accurate. It's based on voltage coming from the battery. Alkaline batteries produce a certain number of volts at the beginning and end of their lifecycle. That's what the meter is calibrated to.

Rechargeables and lithiums have slightly different voltage patterns throughout their use cycle. For example, my NiMH rechargeables fresh off a recharge only show battery capacity of around 65% when installed. But the voltage curve for those batteries is a much "flatter" line over time. If I come to check the camera and it's at 40-45%, they are doing just fine. If they show <30%, they will probably last for several more weeks but since they are rechargeable I just go ahead and swap them out at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's not going to be accurate. It's based on voltage coming from the battery. Alkaline batteries produce a certain number of volts at the beginning and end of their lifecycle. That's what the meter is calibrated to.

Rechargeables and lithiums have slightly different voltage patterns throughout their use cycle. For example, my NiMH rechargeables fresh off a recharge only show battery capacity of around 65% when installed. But the voltage curve for those batteries is a much "flatter" line over time. If I come to check the camera and it's at 40-45%, they are doing just fine. If they show <30%, they will probably last for several more weeks but since they are rechargeable I just go ahead and swap them out at that point.
I thought as much. Thanks
 

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That's not going to be accurate. It's based on voltage coming from the battery. Alkaline batteries produce a certain number of volts at the beginning and end of their lifecycle. That's what the meter is calibrated to.

Rechargeables and lithiums have slightly different voltage patterns throughout their use cycle. For example, my NiMH rechargeables fresh off a recharge only show battery capacity of around 65% when installed. But the voltage curve for those batteries is a much "flatter" line over time. If I come to check the camera and it's at 40-45%, they are doing just fine. If they show <30%, they will probably last for several more weeks but since they are rechargeable I just go ahead and swap them out at that point.
I did not know that. Some good info! I thought I had rechargeables that wouldn't fully recharge. [laugh]
 

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Many of the game cams you see using AA batteries are 12v systems. Alkaline AAs are usually around 1.6v each so with 8 batteries in series you start at 12.8v. Energizer Lithium AAs can be upwards of 1.75v giving you 14v. If the little internal camera meter is designed to read 12v as full, then that lithium is going to show full on the meter for a longer time. Same goes for 6v systems that have 12v worth of batteries. They just run 2 banks of 4 batteries parallel to increase the run time.
 

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Believe the voltage on fully charged NiMH batteries is only a bit over 1.25 volts which is one of the drawbacks with that chemistry, same was/is true for the older chemistry of NiCad batteries. As I understand it the new Lithium rechargeable AA batteries are 3.7 volts internally but each battery has what is essentially a step down circuit so they put out a regulated 1.5 volts until run down enough to shut the circuit off to prevent excess discharge which can damage the cell. My gripe with them is that the companies are using a bit of trickery in the way they list the capacity which tells me they are not really packing that much juice into them. Never the less I bought a set of 4 to try in my Wraith HD night vision scope to see how they hold up and what kind of run time they provide. Supposedly get about 4 hours of continuous run time out of a set of Alkaline AA, longer out of the one use Lithium though I have not tested that, will be interesting to see the duration of these rechargeable Lithium based AA size cells.
 

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Browning trail cams have a setting in the setup menu that you can change to when using Lithium vs. Alkaline batteries.
 

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Believe the voltage on fully charged NiMH batteries is only a bit over 1.25 volts which is one of the drawbacks with that chemistry, same was/is true for the older chemistry of NiCad batteries. As I understand it the new Lithium rechargeable AA batteries are 3.7 volts internally but each battery has what is essentially a step down circuit so they put out a regulated 1.5 volts until run down enough to shut the circuit off to prevent excess discharge which can damage the cell. My gripe with them is that the companies are using a bit of trickery in the way they list the capacity which tells me they are not really packing that much juice into them. Never the less I bought a set of 4 to try in my Wraith HD night vision scope to see how they hold up and what kind of run time they provide. Supposedly get about 4 hours of continuous run time out of a set of Alkaline AA, longer out of the one use Lithium though I have not tested that, will be interesting to see the duration of these rechargeable Lithium based AA size cells.
If you are talking about using Rechargeable LiIon batteries (14500 which is AA size) in electronics meant for AA, thats a bad idea. Likely to fry your electronics with over voltage. They have 3.7 volts like you said but don't step down to 1.5 volts. Some are protected meaning they have a tiny protection circuit that insures they don't over charge or over discharge. Lithium primary batteries are completely different from rechargeable LiIon batteries.
 

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If you are talking about using Rechargeable LiIon batteries (14500 which is AA size) in electronics meant for AA, thats a bad idea. Likely to fry your electronics with over voltage. They have 3.7 volts like you said but don't step down to 1.5 volts. Some are protected meaning they have a tiny protection circuit that insures they don't over charge or over discharge. Lithium primary batteries are completely different from rechargeable LiIon batteries.
These are the batteries I am talking about. EBL USB rechargeable AA Just metered them and they most definitely are putting out 1.509 vdc. First got on to the availability of them from the Foxoptic.com site because they are selling a different brand as a way to power the Sightmark WRAITH HD night vision unit. My WRAITH is doing quite well with them so far. Obviously only time will tell for sure.
 
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