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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've decided to transition from my Rage mechanicals to fixed broadheads. The primary reason is I do so much hunting from the ground. I need a broadhead that will stay put when I bump into limbs, brush, etc.

Here's the thing: I know very little about fixed broadheads, so for the purposes of this thread assume I'm a beginner.

The mechanicals I use - the "original" 2-blade expandable - fly exactly like my field points. So I've got 1/2 doz or so arrows with field points and a few with the Rage practice points. The target I use is NOT for use with fixed broadheads, so I assume my first order of business is to buy a new target, correct?

And since I need to practice with my broadheads - and not field points like I do now - I'll need to buy 2x as many broadheads as I need for hunting so I can use the others for practice, correct?

Can fixed broadheads fired into a target be used for hunting, so long as I can sharpen them adequately? Or is it best to reserve some for practice and never use the "hunting" heads for anything other than shooting at a deer?

To y'all experts these will sound like silly "newbie" questions, which is exactly my purpose.

thanks for all input!
 

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There are many options available to you; but I will offer some ideas for your consideration. First, if you tune your arrows to the bow like the Ranch Fairy explains, field points and broadheads should group the same with rare exception. If you do this, you can get a cheaper target just to confirm your field points and broadheads group the same. I like shooting broadheads so I keep some good broadhead targets. The Block targets are good...but expensive. I like a target I think they call the Blob...can shoot a million times in it for little money but its too heavy to ship so you have to get one at a 3-D shoot when the guy that has them comes around.

Stinger broadheads (Magnus) are well known to 'group just like a field point' and they are extremely easy to re-sharpen with a KME sharpener. Mr. Gillette would be envious, but it only works on the two blade design which I prefer anyway. Its a stainless steel design so once sharpened, they pretty much stay sharp the entire season. If you go down this path, I will give you more info on how to use the sharpener. I love the Stinger head on some of my arrow setups. I've killed a ton of deer with them.

If you hate spending time sharpening, even an accusharp does an acceptable job on these heads with a few strokes... and you can get them at most hardware stores.
 

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There's also the option of using a fixed blade broadhead with replaceable blade, if you don't want to try sharpening. In fact, muzzys have practice blades also. Maybe some of the others do as well.
I just purchased a stay sharp guide. Pretty cheap option for sharpening blades. www.staysharpguide.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are many options available to you; but I will offer some ideas for your consideration. First, if you tune your arrows to the bow like the Ranch Fairy explains, field points and broadheads should group the same with rare exception. If you do this, you can get a cheaper target just to confirm your field points and broadheads group the same. I like shooting broadheads so I keep some good broadhead targets. The Block targets are good...but expensive. I like a target I think they call the Blob...can shoot a million times in it for little money but its too heavy to ship so you have to get one at a 3-D shoot when the guy that has them comes around.

Stinger broadheads (Magnus) are well known to 'group just like a field point' and they are extremely easy to re-sharpen with a KME sharpener. Mr. Gillette would be envious, but it only works on the two blade design which I prefer anyway. Its a stainless steel design so once sharpened, they pretty much stay sharp the entire season. If you go down this path, I will give you more info on how to use the sharpener. I love the Stinger head on some of my arrow setups. I've killed a ton of deer with them.

If you hate spending time sharpening, even an accusharp does an acceptable job on these heads with a few strokes... and you can get them at most hardware stores.
THANK YOU, Stringwacker! Ok...I like several things you mentioned. First, the 2-blade design sounds good to me, and I DO NOT mind sharpening. After hunting and playing guitar, my next passion is cooking. And Im obsessive about my knives being shave-my-face sharp! I don't own the KME sharpener, but I've got several others, including the Darex Work Sharp system with pretty much every option and attachment! I've been known to sit and binge-watch entire Netflix series with my wife while sharpening every knife in the house, LOL!

I'm very interested in the heavy FOC approach of the Ranch Fairy, and I don't mind sharpening. So....???

I want an archery setup that lends itself to hunting from the ground, with most shot opportunities in the 10-20 yard range.
 

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There's also the option of using a fixed blade broadhead with replaceable blade, if you don't want to try sharpening. In fact, muzzys have practice blades also. Maybe some of the others do as well.
I just purchased a stay sharp guide. Pretty cheap option for sharpening blades. www.staysharpguide.com
Good point...the Stinger offers replaceable blades as well.
 

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The bigger issue may be how you gain the higher FOC and tune your arrow. I watched only one of the Ranch Fairy's youtube video's...and it was about bareshafting. Nothing he said was wrong; but in the context of simplicity...it didn't provide much on the 'how you do it aspect'

His video actually showed a nock right situation which would have required more FOC weight for the bareshaft to have entered the target straight. Perhaps on a compound its not critical; but it would have been hard to shoot a recurve with what he showed. He left more out than he included.

You need to start with a slightly over-spined arrow and add weight to the front to center the bareshaft arrow flight. For a RH shooter, A nock right means to add weight to the front of the arrow. A nock left means to reduce weight to the front of the arrow. A nock low means to raise your nocking point and vice -versa if it hits too high.

Adding weight can be done many ways. Adding a heavier broadhead is the easiest but it narrows your selection choices. (For example a Stinger only comes in 125 and 150 weights in the two blade). Often people use glue on broadheads and glue to a broadhead adapter which can make a 125 grain head turn into anything from a 161 grain head to a 250 grain head depending on what broadhead adapter is used.

Yet still, there are internal and external weights that can be added. External weights are just 5 grain brass washers which you can add as many as three behind the broadhead, (These are good for fine tuning when you get it close)There are internal weights that screw in the back of some inserts/brands of arrows that allow 10 to 100 grains to be inserted in the tube. Its all get a bit complex and I'm sure that is why the Ranch Fairy didn't go there.

If you struggle with the concept, I have a lifetime supply of different broadheads, field points, broadhead adaptors,weights for FOC options. I may not be able to tune a compound, but would offer my assistance to try if you wanted to come by my home one day. I'm sure I know more about bare shaft tuning with weights than the majority of archery shops. I owe you for the Mississippi Post Roast idea... best thing I ever ate!
 

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From what I saw on the THP video with Ranch Fairy he seems very much into trial and error. I was surprised that he didn’t know more details of tuning.
I might take a look at the Helix from Tim Strickland.
 

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The only fixed head I’ve ever shot that flew true was a Muzzy MX3. Others may fly great in a well tuned bow, I’m sure my bow wasn’t well tuned at the time. I’ve shot spitfires for the last 15 years and wouldn’t think of switching to anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've shot spitfires for the last 15 years and wouldn't think of switching to anything else.
I have NOTHING against mechanicals from a strictly performance standpoint. But I stalk with my bow WAY more than I sit or use a stand. And even when I use a stand I often walk 1/2 mile or more. As I'm working through these thick river bottoms I'm constandly bumping my knocked arrow into stuff. Two years ago I drew back on a doe that had stepped out into a clearing I was about to enter, and my Rage was dangling! Somewhere along the way I'd clipped a branch or something.

I now consider fixed blades the only option for me unless I want to totally change how I hunt - which I don't.
 

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I would get a couple of different spine gold tips and then get their weight system. You can screw weight to the back of the insert. You go in from the nock. It might be a little time consuming but better than buying a bunch of arrows that are wrong.
 

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I can't seem to get this youtube link to work in the message but search youtube for "Bow Tuning Tips / Broadhead Tuning" by Kenny Parson and follow his instructions. As long as your bow specs are set correct you can get a broadhead and field point shooting the same. I used that method when I shot compounds and they grouped perfectly except for one time after I had my string replaced and the shop had several things on my bow out of whack, I corrected them and all the issues went away and back to perfect broadhead flight and grouping.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can't seem to get this youtube link to work in the message but search youtube for "Bow Tuning Tips / Broadhead Tuning" by Kenny Parson and follow his instructions. As long as your bow specs are set correct you can get a broadhead and field point shooting the same. I used that method when I shot compounds and they grouped perfectly except for one time after I had my string replaced and the shop had several things on my bow out of whack, I corrected them and all the issues went away and back to perfect broadhead flight and grouping.

Thanks 8uptradhunter! Do you have a preferred broadhead?
 

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I used Muzzy and Thunderhead 3 blade broadheads most of my compound years. Since going to trad I shoot Magnus Stingers with 3 of my bows and Simmons Tiger Sharks with the other one.
 

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I’ve shot the standard and magnum and had great results with both. Heard good things on the other brands also. Mine fly like my fieldpoints and I get pass-thrus
 

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Go to archeytalk and join. Then search broad head tuning. You will find more info than you have time to read. If your bow is properly tuned with arrows that are the correct spine you can make any broad head hit the same as your field points. As long as they’re the same weight. On the other hand I think it is easier to spot and stalk with a mechanical head. I’ve caught more than one fixed head with a vine and had it pull the arrow off the string. Just get a head that will stay closed. Like the spitfire or killzone. Even the new rages with the collar doesn’t open as easy as the old rage. The first ones they made would open sitting in a tree stand lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Go to archeytalk and join. Then search broad head tuning. You will find more info than you have time to read. If your bow is properly tuned with arrows that are the correct spine you can make any broad head hit the same as your field points. As long as they're the same weight. On the other hand I think it is easier to spot and stalk with a mechanical head. I've caught more than one fixed head with a vine and had it pull the arrow off the string. Just get a head that will stay closed. Like the spitfire or killzone. Even the new rages with the collar doesn't open as easy as the old rage. The first ones they made would open sitting in a tree stand lol.
Thank you for the acherytalk suggestion.

As for the vines pulling the fixed heads off the string, wouldn't that also happen with the mechs?

As for the new Rages, my experience is opposite. I used the old ones for years, bought all new ones last year, and IMO it's the weakest design I can imagine, and I don't know why anyone would trust it. I cannot even count how many times those heads popped open last season. I hunt VERY thick river bottoms where visibility often is no more than 15-20 yards, and I have to climb over, under, around buckbrush, deadfall, walls of vines and fallen timber. I'd rather my arrow pop completely off the string than draw back and discover a blade dangling, lol.

EDIT: After my comment about the new Rages, I went to the Feradyne website and chatted with a support person about my experiences with the new model Rage, with the slitted plasted collars. His opinion is that I'm torquing the head too tight, causing the collar to flange out too much. So I removed all my collars, pressed all the flanges inward, and I put them back on with perhaps 20% less pressure. I have to say the blades feel much more secure. Perhaps I'll give them the early part of the season as a test.
 

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In looking at your other post about FOC, I will say that your use of any 125 grain screw in head is likely to limit you in your higher FOC approach unless you use a Gold Tip or aluminum arrow with the ability to add internal weights.

I have always liked glue on heads in combination with a steel broadhead adaptor to get up in the 225 grain range. (125 grain broadhead and 100 grain steel adaptor) Since I use both aluminum and carbon that are internal weight compatible; I switch back and forth between Zwickey's, Razorheads, Woodsman. and Stingers without difficulty.

I just bring it up to mention your not going to get a high FOC (if desirable) with most screw in heads without internal weights, while you can shot almost any arrow with glue on heads as long as your arrow spine supports it.
 

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In looking at your other post about FOC, I will say that your use of any 125 grain screw in head is likely to limit you in your higher FOC approach unless you use a Gold Tip or aluminum arrow with the ability to add internal weights.

I have always liked glue on heads in combination with a steel broadhead adaptor to get up in the 225 grain range. (125 grain broadhead and 100 grain steel adaptor) Since I use both aluminum and carbon that are internal weight compatible; I switch back and forth between Zwickey's, Razorheads, Woodsman. and Stingers without difficulty.

I just bring it up to mention your not going to get a high FOC (if desirable) with most screw in heads without internal weights, while you can shot almost any arrow with glue on heads as long as your arrow spine supports it.
You are correct. However, several companies make inserts in higher weights now. Ethics archery is one. I'm using a stainless ethics insert that is adjustable (by cutting off lengths of it) from 125 to 200 grains. I'm 250 up front, 125 magnus and 125 insert. That's putting me at around 19% FOC with a 535 grain arrow. My last setup was 6% in a 420 grain package.
Another secret is to go with an arrow that is as light as possible to raise the FOC. The victories I'm using now are nearly 2 grains per inch lighter than the comparable axis in 300 spine. That's what I used until this year. With all the options in getting weight up front, you can easily get over 500 grains per arrow with a relatively high FOC.
Finally, we compound shooters need to watch what we put on the back of the arrow. It doesn't take much weight at all to bring FOC down fast. I've shot lighted nocks for years. This year I'm scrapping them as well as wraps.
Lots of options out there now.
 
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