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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is your preferred method of planting your food plots? For example we disk and till then drag the plots with a harrow. Then broadcast the large seeds, i.e. oats, wheat, peas and drag harrow again to cover and then we broad cast the small seed like clover and rape and pray for rain. We are looking at getting a cultipacker to firm up the soil and to press the seeds into soil for better contact. Is there a better way like a grain drill/cultipacker like a Firminator piece of equipment to get the plots planted?
 

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Generally, some combination of spray, spread and mow (scalp as low as possible).

If vegetation is where we want it, we spray herbicide, wait 7-10 days, spread seed and fertilizer and then scalp the dead vegetation down on top of the seed/fertilizer.

If the vegetation is too dense, then we may high clip to roughly 20-24 inches before starting the spray, spread and mow.

If there is no vegetation, then we have to go conventional. Clip to ground, disk, spread and drag.

If we are planting into an existing vetch plot, we skip the spraying because we want the vetch to hold on until first frost.

If we are planting into an existing clover plot, we use selective herbicides rather than non-selectives so we don't burn the clover.

In years like this where we don't get rainfall after planting, it is difficult regardless of the method. However, the throw and mow plots are doing better than the plots we had to disk. Regardless of your method, a cultipacker run over the plots after planting will help. If you have the money to invest, a no-till drill will get your plots up more reliably than other methods if you are starting with good soil moisture, but thereafter lack rainfall.
 

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Randy you think this frost we got this morning will kill off the vetch? I have a nice lil stand of it that deer are still hitting and actually held off on planting that plot due to vetch in it.
 

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Randy you think this frost we got this morning will kill off the vetch? I have a nice lil stand of it that deer are still hitting and actually held off on planting that plot due to vetch in it.
I don't know what county you are in or what the temp got down to, but it is very likely the 2 successive days of frost we received in Hinds killed what we planted. Vetch is not frost tolerant at all. It really isn't even terribly cold tolerant.

The good news is that all the nitrogen the vetch had on its roots will now be available for your next plot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Out of curiosity, do y'all plant a single seed, i.e. oats or wheat or a mix. If you plant a mix, do you buy a premixed seed blend or blend your own? The past several years we have planted a premixed blend but this year I purchased separate seeds and blended them as we planted.
 

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Out of curiosity, do y'all plant a single seed, i.e. oats or wheat or a mix. If you plant a mix, do you buy a premixed seed blend or blend your own? The past several years we have planted a premixed blend but this year I purchased separate seeds and blended them as we planted.
I usually buy individual bags and mix myself but this year I bought premixed due to being short in time with my 2 youngsters playing football games on Saturday mornings. The premix is the exact same thing I used to mix which is wheat, oat, cereal rye crimson clover and radish. I did buy a 50# bag of winter peas to throw also.
 

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Out of curiosity, do y'all plant a single seed, i.e. oats or wheat or a mix. If you plant a mix, do you buy a premixed seed blend or blend your own? The past several years we have planted a premixed blend but this year I purchased separate seeds and blended them as we planted.
Mix it ourselves. We always have wheat and cereal rye along with some clovers. This year we upped the clovers considerably to help rebound from the great army worm infestation of 2021.
 

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Randy do prefer cereal rye over forage oaks?
They both have their place, but I do prefer cereal rye to oats for cold season longevity. We typically plant our fall plots the last weekend of September and have some clover and vetch plots already established providing forage along with supplemental feeding. So, the usual advantage of oats being heat tolerant and getting up quickly doesn't provide a huge benefit to me. I will use them in our mix if the price is decent when I book. They are constantly coming out with newer varieties of everything, but usually more bang for the $$ with cereal rye and wheat.
 
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