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Is anyone going to use traditional only gear this season? I do have a compound that I probably will use some but I will be using my recurve and longbows as well. Being retired, maybe I will get a good chance with all 3 bows this year due to being able to hunt more. Thanks. ><> del
 

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I've always used traditional gear throughout the deer seasons for going on 35 years. This year will be no different. Last year I retired so its really nice to go whenever or how much I want to.

I hope you have a great season!
 

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I've always used traditional gear throughout the deer seasons for going on 35 years.
Hey String, how would you recommend someone in his almost mid-50s to get started hunting with trad equipment? I started with a cheap recurve at age 13, then a compound at 14. It became a passion and I began shooting in competitions. Got away from it for almost 20 years, then around age 40 picked it back up with all new equipment (compound bow, carbon arrows, mechanical blades) for hunting. No more shooting for scores for me.

Now I'm considering traditional. There are several reasons, but one of the most important is I believe it's easier to hunt deer from the ground using a trad bow than with a compound. Lighter to carry, and I can get shots off more quicky, especially since I shoot trad bows instinctively and with fingers.

My first question is: is it ok to switch between trad and compound, or best to stick with one or the other?

What is the general price point where recurves and longbows go from "beginner" or "hobby" level to products that one would hunt with and not be missing anything critically important? IOW, what's the minimum price range that would include bows you personally would recommend?

Does the draw weight of a recurve roughly correspond to that of a compound? For example, my compound bow is set between 65 - 70lb. Considering there is no let-off with a recurve, is it best to step down in draw weight?

What arrow material and design do you like?

And, finally [for now :)] what do you like for broadheads?

**All are invited to provide insight! I just addressed Stringwacker because he's a trad-only guy, and it's clear he knows his stuff.
 

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Jake I'm going to wait and let Mark discus this with you but I can tell you that I've been doing this well over 50 years and I can tell you that you will get the most satisfaction that you can ever get out of bow hunting if you go that route in my opinion. I know everyone has there own views on this but give it a try and I don't think you will go back the other way.
 

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Hey String, how would you recommend someone in his almost mid-50s to get started hunting with trad equipment? I started with a cheap recurve at age 13, then a compound at 14. It became a passion and I began shooting in competitions. Got away from it for almost 20 years, then around age 40 picked it back up with all new equipment (compound bow, carbon arrows, mechanical blades) for hunting. No more shooting for scores for me.

Now I'm considering traditional. There are several reasons, but one of the most important is I believe it's easier to hunt deer from the ground using a trad bow than with a compound. Lighter to carry, and I can get shots off more quicky, especially since I shoot trad bows instinctively and with fingers.

My first question is: is it ok to switch between trad and compound, or best to stick with one or the other?

What is the general price point where recurves and longbows go from "beginner" or "hobby" level to products that one would hunt with and not be missing anything critically important? IOW, what's the minimum price range that would include bows you personally would recommend?

Does the draw weight of a recurve roughly correspond to that of a compound? For example, my compound bow is set between 65 - 70lb. Considering there is no let-off with a recurve, is it best to step down in draw weight?

What arrow material and design do you like?

And, finally [for now :)] what do you like for broadheads?

**All are invited to provide insight! I just addressed Stringwacker because he's a trad-only guy, and it's clear he knows his stuff.
Thanks for the kind words but many folks here are likely as (or more) qualified than me to answer your questions.

The first question you asked was about switching back and forth between compound and traditional equipment. It can certainly be done as I know quite a few people who are pretty proficient both ways. Given I stopped shooting a compound one day and went (back) with a recurve the next, I really can't provide good insight. I think you develop a preference pretty quick one way or the other. Clearly, I was thrilled with the traditional bows and never went back.

Like all other things in life, you get what you pay for when buying a traditional bow. Plenty of folks hunt with bows like a Samick which I think cost around $200, then you get into the vintage Bears which are really good bows for about the same money but are often 25-40 years old. The older bows shoot a B-50 Dacron string and you lose about 7 to 10 ft a second over a low strength string like Dynaflight 97. My son likely killed 20 deer with a vintage 35 pound Ben Pearson bow with Dacron so the answer to your question is if the bow fits you and you like it, you can be very effective with less cost than the higher end recurves. Always keep in mind, that the sport is really 25 yards or less (really most people would say 20 yards) and a bent stick and a good arrow will work well.

The higher end bows (Black Widow, Stalker, Bob Lee, ILF designs and too many other great bowyers to name) offer a great product in the range of about $800 to $1500 dollars. Its probably better to get a bow that is the right length and poundage for you than too worry to much about the bow. I will end this part of the discussion by saying you will find used bows made by top end bowyers are a bargain in comparison to new.... and that would be my suggestion to you. Good used bows can be found if you look hard enough $300 to $800 dollars. I'm partial to Black Widow...but some folks hate them.

Your setup will be different than your compound. Your draw length will shorten about 1.5" compared to a compound just due to the difference in how you shoot it. I also would say that you should likely drop 20 pounds over your compound weight. Must adult men will find their comfortable poundage between 45 and 55 pounds...with an emphasis on the lower end. 30 pounds is all you need for deer but a little higher weight flattens out your shot.

Arrow material is purely a matter of preference. I switch all the time between wood, aluminum and carbon. All have their place. For the first bow, some Gold tip carbon traditionals are a good start. They are made with threaded inserts so internal weights can be used to tune the arrow to the bow. They don't break the bank either.

As for as broadheads, as long as they are two blade and I can sharpen them; they are all pretty good. I like the Magnus Stinger, Bear Razorheads, and Zwickey Eskimo's. I've probably killed more with the Eskimo than all the rest put together. Of the last few years, I have used the Magnus Stinger a lot more. That's what I would recommend to you.

Traditional archers like to debate longbows vs recurves, the best brand bow, three under vs split finger, two blade vs multiblade broadheads (almost no one would consider a mechanical) glove vs tabs, etc. In short...we live and enjoy a different archery universe. The joy of traditional archery is in the personal journey as opposed to the end destination.

You need a mentor to guide you through the process of which bow, poundage, length, quivers etc. I, among many others, would be willing to assist.

I'm sure mature8 pointer can add a great deal that I missed. He's probably forgotten more than I ever knew.
 

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Thanks for the kind words but many folks here are likely as (or more) qualified than me to answer your questions.

The first question you asked was about switching back and forth between compound and traditional equipment. It can certainly be done as I know quite a few people who are pretty proficient both ways. Given I stopped shooting a compound one day and went (back) with a recurve the next, I really can't provide good insight. I think you develop a preference pretty quick one way or the other. Clearly, I was thrilled with the traditional bows and never went back.

Like all other things in life, you get what you pay for when buying a traditional bow. Plenty of folks hunt with bows like a Samick which I think cost around $200, then you get into the vintage Bears which are really good bows for about the same money but are often 25-40 years old. The older bows shoot a B-50 Dacron string and you lose about 7 to 10 ft a second over a low strength string like Dynaflight 97. My son likely killed 20 deer with a vintage 35 pound Ben Pearson bow with Dacron so the answer to your question is if the bow fits you and you like it, you can be very effective with less cost than the higher end recurves. Always keep in mind, that the sport is really 25 yards or less (really most people would say 20 yards) and a bent stick and a good arrow will work well.

The higher end bows (Black Widow, Stalker, Bob Lee, ILF designs and too many other great bowyers to name) offer a great product in the range of about $800 to $1500 dollars. Its probably better to get a bow that is the right length and poundage for you than too worry to much about the bow. I will end this part of the discussion by saying you will find used bows made by top end bowyers are a bargain in comparison to new.... and that would be my suggestion to you. Good used bows can be found if you look hard enough $300 to $800 dollars. I'm partial to Black Widow...but some folks hate them.

Your setup will be different than your compound. Your draw length will shorten about 1.5" compared to a compound just due to the difference in how you shoot it. I also would say that you should likely drop 20 pounds over your compound weight. Must adult men will find their comfortable poundage between 45 and 55 pounds...with an emphasis on the lower end. 30 pounds is all you need for deer but a little higher weight flattens out your shot.

Arrow material is purely a matter of preference. I switch all the time between wood, aluminum and carbon. All have their place. For the first bow, some Gold tip carbon traditionals are a good start. They are made with threaded inserts so internal weights can be used to tune the arrow to the bow. They don't break the bank either.

As for as broadheads, as long as they are two blade and I can sharpen them; they are all pretty good. I like the Magnus Stinger, Bear Razorheads, and Zwickey Eskimo's. I've probably killed more with the Eskimo than all the rest put together. Of the last few years, I have used the Magnus Stinger a lot more. That's what I would recommend to you.

Traditional archers like to debate longbows vs recurves, the best brand bow, three under vs split finger, two blade vs multiblade broadheads (almost no one would consider a mechanical) glove vs tabs, etc. In short...we live and enjoy a different archery universe. The joy of traditional archery is in the personal journey as opposed to the end destination.

You need a mentor to guide you through the process of which bow, poundage, length, quivers etc. I, among many others, would be willing to assist.

I'm sure mature8 pointer can add a great deal that I missed. He's probably forgotten more than I ever knew.
Wow...what a fantastic answer! Thank you, String! Just a wealth of info.
And of course I welcome all other input as well.

I'm going to think about all these great suggestions, and I'm sure I'll return with another bucket of questions!
 
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