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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since the freeze a few days ago my plots now are all wilted. I planted Oat, Wheat and cereal rye along with crimson clover. I plan to fertilize within a day or 2 in hopes of rejuvenating them.

How did y’all plots hold up in freeze and what did you plant?
 

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I was taking to a Tecomate biologist friend of mine yesterday and he said his phone has been blowing up with folks calling about this same subject. He said there’s not much you can do but wait and see if anything looks like it’s trying to come back and throw some fertilizer on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Any quick tid-bits as to what they said?

Since putting out a little Urea plots are looking better. Whether that was due to Urea or them just coming back naturally due to warmer weather I don’t know.
 

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Basically, it wasn't the cold temps that did the major damage. It was the extreme change in temperature drop that happened in such a short timespan. Plants can survive the low temps, but they normally have time to prepare physiologically. In this rare circumstance, they didn't have time to prepare. The sudden wilting/yellowing was mostly caused by water actually freezing inside the cell walls and bursting the plant's walls.

Grasses like wheats and oats ought to rebound OK. Annual clovers and brassicas are going to have a much harder time rebounding, and its possible they won't. Perennial clovers with a well established root system (not planted this fall) should be OK as their roots should still be alive.

As far as what we can do... Some dry fertilizer applications may help once we get rain and warm weather (most of state just had). Since plant tissue is dead (the yellow/wilt), foliar applications are about useless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Basically, it wasn't the cold temps that did the major damage. It was the extreme change in temperature drop that happened in such a short timespan. Plants can survive the low temps, but they normally have time to prepare physiologically. In this rare circumstance, they didn't have time to prepare. The sudden wilting/yellowing was mostly caused by water actually freezing inside the cell walls and bursting the plant's walls.

Grasses like wheats and oats ought to rebound OK. Annual clovers and brassicas are going to have a much harder time rebounding, and its possible they won't. Perennial clovers with a well established root system (not planted this fall) should be OK as their roots should still be alive.

As far as what we can do... Some dry fertilizer applications may help once we get rain and warm weather (most of state just had). Since plant tissue is dead (the yellow/wilt), foliar applications are about useless.
Thanks for the info! Deer are still eating them so hopefully they rebound.
 

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Grasses like wheats and oats ought to rebound OK. Annual clovers and brassicas are going to have a much harder time rebounding, and its possible they won't. Perennial clovers with a well established root system (not planted this fall) should be OK as their roots should still be alive.
Lovely. We planted a considerable amount of various clovers this year to rebound from an army worm infestation that wiped us out last year. Sure hope some of it makes it through to the spring.
 

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I’d say DH88 hit the nail on the head with what was in the podcast. I drilled wheat and durana. Sure hoping I don’t lose all of the clover. Couldn’t care less about the wheat.
 
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